hard pears and honey.

Red is my favourite colour, and when I see it on pears it always feels like a bit of a bonus, simply because I normally think of pears as being yellow. In any case, I saw some pretty ones in the grocery store about 10 days ago and brought them home. I set them in a dish on the sideboard to finish ripening, but to no avail. We’ve covered them for a few days to see if the dark would help. Nope.

They remain almost as hard as apples to this day. Occasionally this happens where we live. Fruit that normally softens at room temperature simply refuses to do so. Alot of the fruit here is picked before it ripens in order to travel to Alberta from some milder climate where it began its life. I can almost relate. I, too, was transported from Southwestern B.C. before maturity, and have dealt with some of my own reservations about resettling in this colder climate. (This could be another post about blooming where one is planted.) Naturally, some fruit will fail to cooperate.

But last night I was reading in Encore Provence, By Peter Mayle. He mentioned simmered pears he’d eaten for dessert once in a local French restaurant, and now I’m eating lovely simmered pears for my own dessert right here… Voila!

Just like that, problem solved.

Hard pears are a problem, albeit a very small, and pretty nice kind of problem to have. And like so many other such perplexities, there are solutions. Simple solutions. Solutions we can learn and adapt (In the book, the pears in the Provencal restaurant were simmered in wine. I just simmered mine in water with a spoonful of honey) from people all around us. Including people we’ve never met, who write or sing or talk; who find ways to share what they know and love.

Not all of the challenges life presents us with are as easily surmounted as making lemons into lemonade or dessert out of non-ripening fruit. Some of our troubles are very big, and some can’t be fixed; they must be accepted and dealt with as best we can from one day (or one moment) to the next. So when we can handle the little bumps in our life’s path with ease and sweetness, I think that’s something to celebrate.

So blessed,

Leah

Grace.

This is one fun girl; let me tell you.

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I’m feeling pretty blessed this week. I get to spend some sweet time with my cute niece, Grace. She’s being a good sport about going out to soak up some smiles from the sunshine with me day after day… We take walks and bike rides along the river; such a good time.

We decided to try making homemade perogies this week, since we both love cooking and baking. The recipe (if you can call it that) was super simple, and they turned super yummy! Here’s how we did it:

Homemade Perogies

Mix 2 cups of sour cream with just enough flour to make a smooth, soft, somewhat sticky dough. Knead it for a few seconds on a floured surface and cut into about 20 pieces. Roll each piece into a ball and then use a rolling pin to flatten it out into a thin little disc. 

For the filling: Boil 4 medium-sized(russet) potatoes, and mashed them with butter, shredded cheddar cheese, and bacon bits. Then put a little blob of this on each perogy,  fold it over, and pinch the curved edge closed tightly to seal. 

Set half of them in a large pot of boiling water, and gently stir as needed to make sure they don’t stick to each other or to the bottom of the pot. (Repeat with the other half once these first ones are finished). They’ll be floating when they’re done, in just a few minutes. We took them out shortly after this, and laid them in a serving dish with butter until we were ready to eat them with sour cream. Mmm.

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Grace is sweet, affectionate, and funny. I like playing with her gorgeous hair, laughing our way through a game of Dutch Blitz, and making sourdough bread for her to eat. We all enjoy her slightly cheeky sense of humour, and love having her come to visit!

So blessed,

Leah

camera phones.

Practical things. Like sending a friend pictures of seeds for our shared garden during a text conversation. How handy is it that we always have a camera on us?

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And how much handier is it that whatever image we capture at any given moment, we can instantly send or share it with anyone else?!

Clearly this picture never had the potential to change the world, but how many times have I been at the store and wondered if I was looking at or holding the right item. Not a problem; I just take a photo of it and send it to whoever I’m texting with or talking to. Right then and there.

This reminds me of a concept I’ve heard about; hedonic adaptation. This term just refers to the way we quickly absorb the waves of happiness that good things bring to our lives; at first we may be tickled pink to enjoy a new pleasure or convenience, but not for long. I’ve only had a camera phone in my hand for about half of my life, but it’s so easy for me to forget how much of a privilege it actually is.

And speaking of privilege… 😉 a couple months ago, shortly before COVID-19 closed things down, I treated myself to a gel manicure. My natural fingernails often behave like puff pastry and think they should shred and peel at the slightest provocation. I know; I need more collagen. I’m working on it. In the meantime, I’d gone in to a nail studio for a quick fix. It was a busy place. While I was waiting, I took the opportunity to choose the colour I wanted, to save time once my appointment actually started. Snap. I was ready with my image when my nail technician asked. Just so. Then, as I was about to leave, I saw a sign which promised that if I posted a photo of my nails in the salon, I’d be entered in a draw for a free manicure. Accordingly, I quickly took a little picture of my much-improved hands, and posted it to my instagram feed, tagging the nail shop.

Again, not earth-shattering. Still, for every such innocuous example, there must be dozens out there of camera phones to the rescue on matters of much greater import.

So blessed,

Leah 

p.s. Did I win the draw for a free manicure? This remains to be seen; there must still be a remote chance that I’ll get a call once business gets back underway. It’s possible…

white chocolate craisin cookies.

Today is our 24th wedding anniversary. What we had planned was a visit to this dreamy nearby destination: Kananaskis Nordic Spa.

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-what we had in mind-

However, this is not to be. (Once again, thanks, COVID-19.) Instead, we exchanged cards and gifts at home, and we’re ordering in from our all-time favourite restaurant (NOtaBLE), which is now very local to us, since our move almost a year ago. I’m sure the dinner will be delicious, even though we’ll be enjoying it as take-out. Better not complain.

In the meantime, I wanted to make a treat for Kirby today. I asked him what he’d like, and he replied, without hesitation, that he’d love these cookies. I’ve adapted the recipe a bit, and here’s how it goes now:

White Chocolate Craisin Cookies

Cream 3/4 cup butter with 1 & 1/2 cups sugar. Beat in 2 eggs, and a teaspoon each of salt, baking soda, and vanilla. Stir in 2 & 1/2 cups flour, then 2 cups combined craisins and white chocolate chips. Bake in 1 tablespoon lumps on parchment paper-lined cookie sheet, at 350 degrees F for about 9 minutes. Let cool a couple minutes before lifting them off the pan with a thin metal flipper. 

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-real life-

So, this isn’t quite the romantic spa getaway we had in mind. But, all things considered, it’s a pretty sweet anniversary anyway. Celebrating at home, yeah. But so grateful for what we have to celebrate at all. Plus, cookies. Mmm.

So blessed,

Leah