hard pears and honey.

Red is my favourite colour, and when I see it on pears it always feels like a bit of a bonus, simply because I normally think of pears as being yellow. In any case, I saw some pretty ones in the grocery store about 10 days ago and brought them home. I set them in a dish on the sideboard to finish ripening, but to no avail. We’ve covered them for a few days to see if the dark would help. Nope.

They remain almost as hard as apples to this day. Occasionally this happens where we live. Fruit that normally softens at room temperature simply refuses to do so. Alot of the fruit here is picked before it ripens in order to travel to Alberta from some milder climate where it began its life. I can almost relate. I, too, was transported from Southwestern B.C. before maturity, and have dealt with some of my own reservations about resettling in this colder climate. (This could be another post about blooming where one is planted.) Naturally, some fruit will fail to cooperate.

But last night I was reading in Encore Provence, By Peter Mayle. He mentioned simmered pears he’d eaten for dessert once in a local French restaurant, and now I’m eating lovely simmered pears for my own dessert right here… Voila!

Just like that, problem solved.

Hard pears are a problem, albeit a very small, and pretty nice kind of problem to have. And like so many other such perplexities, there are solutions. Simple solutions. Solutions we can learn and adapt (In the book, the pears in the Provencal restaurant were simmered in wine. I just simmered mine in water with a spoonful of honey) from people all around us. Including people we’ve never met, who write or sing or talk; who find ways to share what they know and love.

Not all of the challenges life presents us with are as easily surmounted as making lemons into lemonade or dessert out of non-ripening fruit. Some of our troubles are very big, and some can’t be fixed; they must be accepted and dealt with as best we can from one day (or one moment) to the next. So when we can handle the little bumps in our life’s path with ease and sweetness, I think that’s something to celebrate.

So blessed,

Leah

French Your Way.

I love listening to the charming and pretty voice of this passionate French language teacher!

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“To have another language is to possess a second soul.”
Charlemagne

I don’t know if I can go quite that far, but I do agree with the basic sentiment; language expresses so much culture! And I do find the French language beautiful and fascinating.

I’m studying with the University of Calgary to become a professional English language teacher, for people who have a different first language. So I think it’s key for me to come back to studying my second language. Being on the learner end adds essential perspective. Empathy.

If you, like me, took French classes in school, and have some extra time on your hands, maybe you’d like to take a listen. If so, here’s a link to Jessica’s podcast webpage:

French Your Way podcast

I initially found French Your Way on the apple podcast app in my phone, but to start at the beginning, and get the very earliest episodes I went to her website. This was serendipitous; online I found Jessica’s free articles and worksheets full of helpful tips and opportunities to practice. She’s  a very experienced professional, so anything I can learn from her is a gift!

I’m sure there are countless online resources for learning other languages, but this one is a favourite of mine. This lovely lady is a native French speaker who studied for 7 years in University before embarking on a language teaching career that allowed her to travel and work in various places.

She eventually settled in Australia, where she now lives with her husband and baby daughter. Once or twice while listening to a podcast I’ve caught a tiny baby voice in the background, which is very sweet to me. Because- babies are adorable. I hope that as her little girl grows up speaking her mother’s beautiful language, I might hear her again.

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Orlova Maria (unsplash)

High-quality, free French language-learning resources.

So blessed,

Leah 

happier.

“One of the best ways to make yourself happy is to make other people happy. One of the best ways to make other people happy is to be happy yourself.” ~Gretchen Rubin~

This is one great podcast. It’s the first one I ever started listening to, and still a favourite.

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This woman is brilliant. Actually a genius. She left a promising career as a Yale-trained lawyer to become a writer who researches happiness. Also, her smart and funny younger sister, Liz, joins her; the podcast episodes are a dialogue between the two of them, with occasional guests interviewed from time to time.

Most episode include these cute little sections: “Try This At Home”, Happiness Hack”, and “Demerits and Gold Stars” (pretty funny, t.b.h.). These two. Anyway, there’s a huge community of listeners, many of whom write and call in with questions, answers, and sometimes rather amusing arguments.

I’d read some of Gretchen Rubin’s books, beginning with The Happiness Project, and Happier at Home). Eventually I read her newer offerings, and wrote little blog posts about these two: Better Than Before and The Four Tendencies. When I learned she had a podcast, I was excited to hear her talking about all these ideas. But when I heard their voices I was surprised; they sounded so down-to-earth. I don’t know what I was expecting, maybe more cerebral-sounding voices?  Anyway, I find their unabashed openness and vulnerability super relatable.

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Liz (l) and Gretchen (r)

When I first started with the Happier podcast, I was binge-listening for a while as I started at the beginning and gradually ‘caught up’. Now, of course I just listen to them as they’re released. They often make me laugh, and I always learn something or at least get a little vitamin-shot of motivation to look at things a bit differently, and I think it does make me happier, in real life.

So if you’re interested in listening in on this fun little world, here’s where you can find it:

Happier Podcast

Or you may just want to check out this little list:

Best Of Happier Podcast

Enjoy, my friends!

So blessed,

Leah 

p.s. I always do something else while I listen; often ironing or putting away laundry.

sourdough.

I first cultivated my rambunctious ‘starter’ culture years ago, and it’s still going strong. I haven’t named it until now, but I think I’ve just hit on the perfect appellation for this happy and healthy little creature; I’ll call it Baby.

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This is hardly an original thought, now that I think about it. My family and friends have teased me about my ‘bread babies’ for a few years. I can see why; both are soft and squishy, smell delightful, and are ever so satisfying to nurture. Both babies and Baby like to be touched and need to stretch, and grow especially well when tucked up in a cozy warm place for frequent naps. Both have within them innate qualities; given the right conditions and enough tender loving care, both turn out more wonderful than the mama or the baker can really take credit for…

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When my children were in high school and my house was full of my little dayhome children, I baked 2 loaves a day. At lunch hour, the house seemed to fill up with teenagers who obligingly devoured homemade sourdough bread, helped heartily by the half dozen cute little people who populated it all day with me. Those were the days…

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Sourdough baking is an addictive behaviour, as many will attest. I once saw a man’s twitter account introduction in which he described himself as a ‘pathological sourdough baker’. I could write an entire blog on the subject; many enthusiasts do. But I’ll stick to an occasional post here and there on the topic of my wild-yeasty friends and their exploits.

Again, this is another sweet and simple thing that enriches my life every day, including now, during the pandemic. It makes me happy; making it, seeing it grow, baking it, eating it, and sharing it.

So blessed,

Leah

 

the mindful kind.

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Rachael Kable ~medium~

The way I found this adorable blogger and podcaster is a little odd; I was playing around with possible blog titles a couple years ago, and when I typed in this one (the mindful kind), it was already taken. Thank goodness Rachael Kable thought of it first; she’s amazing.

Since then, I’ve been avidly listening to her gentle and friendly podcasts; binge-listening at first until I caught up, and now weekly, as she releases them. She offers practical tips, enhanced by her genuine kindness and honest vulnerability. She’s trained in psychology, and she works professionally in this field with her coaching business, but she never comes across as too technical or in any way removed from what it feels like to be the one struggling.

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“Mindfulness can be an attitude, a way of living life by connecting with the now and being open and curious about what there is to experience.”

~Rachael Kable, The Mindful Kind~

I haven’t read her book yet, but I will. Or I may order the audiobook, as her voice is very calming, and I love her Australian accent; she lived in Melbourne before moving back to the countryside where she grew up. In the meantime, I just keep following her on instagram and enjoying her short and sweet podcast episodes.

COVID-19 has added plenty of extra tension to life in this lovely world, and if ever we could use regular doses of sweet, calming wisdom, it’s now. Maybe listening in will help fill you up with this mental and emotional comfort food. Her advice is easy to take because it’s delivered with such empathy and compassion.

If you, my friends, would like to check out the offerings of this caring and clever woman, here are a few links. I hope some of you enjoy these little blessings as much as I do!

The Mindful Kind Podcast

Rachael Kable’s Mindfulness Blog

The Mindful Kind Book

Rachael Kable Instagram

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So blessed,

Leah