potted garden.

“If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.” ~ Cicero~

IMG_0821

Well, the public libraries have been closed for COVID, and I live in an apartment condo, but I am turning to the bookshelves in our living room and my library book reading app to meet my book needs.

As for gardens, my husband and I are doing some backyard gardening with friends of ours who live nearby. And… we are growing a lovely little potted garden on our balcony!

IMG_0820

I planted some strawberries and tomatoes, lavender and rosemary, also a geranium, some thyme, basil, and cilantro from local greenhouses. Plus, I planted seeds to grow poppies, peas, spinach, arugula, baby carrots, and maybe some other things. (maybe I should have used some markers…?) We’ll see what comes up!

IMG_0817

As you can see, neither our balcony nor our potted plants can boast over-the-top aesthetic value. Still, I have to admit that growing these containers of food and flowers seems to be making me disproportionately happy. Looking out and seeing green life somehow cheers my soul more than it should. And our little garden has invited birds and bees to visit us on the balcony!

IMG_0823

I’m not the only one who finds joy in messing around with seeds, leaves, and dirt. It’s proven to lift our spirits in so many ways. Here are a couple articles that explain in some weirdly fascinating scientific detail (seratonin-producing soil bacteria, anyone?) just how growing any kind of garden can make us a little- or a lot- happier people.

Gardening: The Key To Health And Happiness

How Does Gardening Make You Happier?

We did prioritize south exposure when we bought this home. I can really relate to plants; I need sunshine to feel ok. But even if we were in an apartment across the hall, with a north-facing balcony, we could grow a garden of shade-loving plants. This simple pleasure is available to so many of us, and I’m grateful for the magic of growing gardens.

So blessed,

Leah 

 

food.

We have enough to eat. Every single day.

65559AD3-D641-4038-8796-ACAD2131311C

Whether it’s a simple loaf of homemade sourdough bread or a delicious family dinner, we don’t face hunger we can’t solve. Not only do we have enough food to eat; we have variety, we have options. Our fridges, freezers, and pantries are so full that we have to be careful to use fresh spinach, frozen meat, and jars of olives before they sit too long and ‘go off’ or get freezer-burned (while we’re busy eating other food from our well-stocked kitchens).

It’s pretty easy for us to get ingredients or meals delivered, pick up our grocery orders at the store, or shop around supermarkets and farmers’ markets for everything we want and need- and then some. How many times have I gotten to the till with a full basket and had the cashier politely ask me if I found everything I was looking for today, only to respond sheepishly that I found plenty more than what I came in for. And I know I’m not alone.

On top of what we buy to eat, most of us can grow even more food. I grew up in the country with parents and grandparents who were avid gardeners. We all helped out with planting, weeding, harvesting, and preserving vast quantities of vegetables and fruits- whether we felt so inclined- or not. It was ‘all-hands-on-deck’. And we raised our children the same way. We had some great times and some hefty harvests over the years. (Enormous zuchini, anyone?)

This spring we’re growing all the veggies we can, plus some herbs and strawberries, in garden boxes at our friends’ places and in containers on our apartment balcony. And thanks to COVID-19, lots more people in lots more places are growing their own food in 2020! Here’s a great news article I found about this ‘silver lining’ on the pandemic cloud.

IMG_9713 (1)
~buckwheat & berry muffins adapted from a favourite cookbook~

Not only do we have the means to buy and grow as much food as we can eat, but so many of us in our prosperous society find we can spend a small fortune on cookbooks, diet books (to advise us on various ways of not eating too much food), and dozens of helpful kitchen gadgets to make it more quick, easy, and fun to prepare our food!

We’re inundated with advice on how and why we should build healthy eating habits, as well as warnings about the negative functional impacts (on our energy, mood, and ability to learn, concentrate, and problem-solve creatively) of poor nutrition. All we have to do is follow through with our good intentions to eat well.

We don’t have to live with chronic hunger-induced brain fog, empty shelves and plates, or crying children whose hunger we can’t resolve. (click this link to see a compelling article from the World Food Program…)

“Every day too many men and women across the globe struggle to feed their children a nutritious meal. In a world where we produce enough food to feed everyone, 821 million people – one in nine – still go to bed on an empty stomach each night.”

There’s something most of us can do about this. We can find ways to share. And it starts with recognizing what we have and feeling gratitude for it…

So blessed,

Leah